City of Queen Anne’s Lace

LOCATION
Wasserman Projects
DATE
Apr 21, 2017

Wed.
Thur.
Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.
closed Sun.-Tue.

2017-04-21 00:00:00America/DetroitCity of Queen Anne’s LaceWasserman Projects is pleased to present the exhibition "City of Queen Anne's Lace." Cuban artists Alejandro Campins and José Yaque capture the energy of Detroit's bustling metropolitan past and the aura of the city's hopeful future. Curated by Rafael DiazCasas, an art historian and independent curator based in New York City, the exhibition explores the parallels between Detroit's rise and fall as a major industrial and cultural hub and the impact of political upheaval during the same period on Cuba's own growth and development. Campins and Yaque spent time exploring Detroit's built environment-from major architectural landmarks to long abandoned residential streets which led to the creation of two distinct bodies of work. Together, the featured works underscore the ways in which physical structures are uniquely positioned as both markers of collective memory and sources for future opportunity and innovation. The title of the exhibition is an extension of the overarching vision for the featured work. Queen Anne's lace, also known as Wild Carrot, is a flowering plant with substantial nutritional and healing properties that can be found growing throughout Detroit. As the artists continued to encounter it during their visit, they found it to be increasingly beautiful - a symbol of change and of natural rebalancing. This feeling became the cornerstone of the work they created for the exhibition and the experience they want to convey to audiences.Wasserman Projects
ADMISSION
Free
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Wasserman Projects is pleased to present the exhibition “City of Queen Anne’s Lace.” Cuban artists Alejandro Campins and José Yaque capture the energy of Detroit’s bustling metropolitan past and the aura of the city’s hopeful future. Curated by Rafael DiazCasas, an art historian and independent curator based in New York City, the exhibition explores the parallels between Detroit’s rise and fall as a major industrial and cultural hub and the impact of political upheaval during the same period on Cuba’s own growth and development. Campins and Yaque spent time exploring Detroit’s built environment-from major architectural landmarks to long abandoned residential streets which led to the creation of two distinct bodies of work. Together, the featured works underscore the ways in which physical structures are uniquely positioned as both markers of collective memory and sources for future opportunity and innovation. The title of the exhibition is an extension of the overarching vision for the featured work. Queen Anne’s lace, also known as Wild Carrot, is a flowering plant with substantial nutritional and healing properties that can be found growing throughout Detroit. As the artists continued to encounter it during their visit, they found it to be increasingly beautiful – a symbol of change and of natural rebalancing. This feeling became the cornerstone of the work they created for the exhibition and the experience they want to convey to audiences.

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